How To Win An Election

To commemorate 100 days of Conservative government in the UK, here are some fun facts on the British democratic process.

 

This is the UK population:

A 64 million total population

 

 

This is how many British people were eligible to vote (in millions):

B voting age population

 

 

This is how many people were registered to vote:

C registered to vote population

 

 

This is how many people voted:

D turnout population

 

 

This is how many British people voted for the Conservative party:

E conservative vote population

 

 

Approximately 33 million people did not or could not vote, 20 million people voted for someone else, and 11 million people voted Conservative.

F all votes population

 

 

These votes were translated into this majority government:

house of commons majority all colours

 

 

These are the House of Commons seats, each seat representing one MP.

House_of_Commons_2015_elections.svg - Copy
Image: Superbenjamin / Wikimedia Commons

 

 

On the one hand, this shakes up the legitimacy of “Conservative majority“. Twice as many people voted for someone else, and three times as many people didn’t or were unable to vote.

Less than 2 in every 11 British people voted Conservative.

 

On the other hand, if the government were chosen by the number of votes (proportional representation) you get these outcomes:

Conservative + UKIP = 49.5%

Labour + Lib Dems + SNP + Green = 46.9%

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